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by Katie Peachesa April 19, 2020 2 min read

G Spot in Women: What It Is, How to Find It, and Sex Positions

By Ekaterina Mironova

Type the text here The elusive "G-spot" has been controversial since the publication in 1982 of The G Spot and Other Recent Discoveries About Human Sexuality, by Alice Kahn Ladas, Beverly Whipple and John D. Perry. At the time it was a well-publicized book that argued for the existence of the Gräfenberg Spot and popularised the term "G-Spot". The G-spot area was first discussed in 1950 when an article by Berlin gynecologist Ernst Gräfenberg was published.

It is theorized that the G-Spot is an area within the vagina that when stimulated, can result in intensely strong orgasms. This is separate and different from orgasms that are a result of stimulating the clitoris, which is located on the outside of the vagina. It is thought that the G-spot is specifically located one to three inches inside the vagina, on the anterior wall (towards the stomach) and is a spot generally around the size of a dime, although the size appears to vary from woman to woman.

Those women that report having a G-spot describe a much more intense, longer, deeper orgasm resulting from the contractions of both the vaginal and uterine walls. This is different from a clitoral orgasm which affects the vaginal walls only. It has been explained that the G-spot responds to firm pressure rather than gentle stroking. Some women report that in response to G-spot stimulation there are vaginal orgasms along with an ejaculation, while others have experienced no such thing.

The G-spot continues to mystify in that it has never been proven to exist in the medical field. There are critics that deny the existence at all. This school of thought was reinforced by Masters & Johnson whose research in 1966 argued that a woman's clitoris was the primary source of both clitoral and vaginal orgasms. The fact that every woman's body is different and responds differently to any kind of touch only complicates the theory that every woman has this extremely sensitive area. For example, some women like having their feet rubbed and some don't. This doesn’t necessarily mean that the G-spot does not exist; it just has not been legitimized in medical literature at this time.

Katie Peachesa
Katie Peachesa

Katie Peachesa is a sex and lingerie blogger based out of the urban chic Wapping in the heart of East London, United Kingdom. In her spare time, Katie enjoys photography, yoga and fitness, a bit of boxing, traveling, keeping up with the latest fashion trends and mudlarking and exploring pastoral settings. You are likely to find Katie in an artisan cafe in Brick Lane on a Saturday afternoon furiously typing her next article on her laptop whilst she is sipping on her flat white and drawing inspiration from the hustle and bustle in the heart of creative London. Katie runs the "Fashion Life Mag" and has been featured in Cosmopolitan, Allure, Grazia, Tatler, Evening Standard and other popular media outlets.


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