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WHAT IS A QUEEF, WHY IT HAPPENS, AND HOW TO STOP QUEEFING

WHAT IS A QUEEF, WHY IT HAPPENS, AND HOW TO STOP QUEEFING

WHAT IS A QUEEF, WHY IT HAPPENS, AND HOW TO STOP QUEEFING

What is a queef? How does a queef happen, and why does it happen? How best can an individual stop queef when it happens? This article explains what a queef is, why it happens and how best an individual can stop a queef when it happens.

A queef is an air released from the vagina with some volume that an individual can hear. Queefing might seem funny, but it can also be uncomfortable. It can be uncomfortable if it happens around people you are not close with or just getting to know them. It is not a disease that needs to be cured because it is completely normal. It is not something that should be of worry or a problem, but there is something that an individual can do to stop it. Some individuals ask how best can be done by an individual to stop queef. This article will delve deeper into the questions and provide some answers.

What is a Queef?

Queef is simply the air from the vagina (Gaddis 2017). When one is turned on, the vagina is likely to expand, and when this happens, the uterus is raised, and its position shifts making it easier for the air to hide inside the vagina. During thrusting, the air is pushed into the vagina repeatedly, making it possible to experience queef during sexual intercourse. If it happens at other times, it is occasionally as the air cannot stay inside the vagina as it needs to find a way to come out. 

Several times you have noticed some queefing when you are inside the water. Mostly the swimming pool or the bathtub. The air that gets out can, at times, produce a sound like a fart. It is referred to as vaginal fart. As a first-timer, you are likely to be shocked and surprised if it happens to you. It is not painful and cannot hurt in any way. However, you might feel very embarrassed or funny depending on your situation and the people surrounding you. 

You are also likely to have a queef when exercising or doing yoga. You don't need to feel terrible about it, as an individual can even make it a joke, and they will be surprised by how many people have experienced it but have never spoken about it. Some were uncomfortable and always felt like it could turn off some people, yet it is natural. You will get some that tell you that they have experienced it after or even during sex with their partner. You will feel like you are not alone. 

How To Stop Queefing?   

You can try and regulate the force that happens during penetrative sex. Hensel et al. (2021) explained that when your partner is thrusting, they should try and control their movement as you can talk to them about the issue and why you want them to control the force they use during thrusting. You can try the following steps to avoid queefing.

  • Make sure that your partner slows down the pace they use when thrusting or penetrating the vagina.
  • They should avoid penetrating too deep into the vagina. You can try by gently holding the penis on the base with your fingers to minimize the penis thrusting too deep into the vagina.
  • Egger et al. (2021) explained that if one feels like a certain position makes them queef more, they can try switching it up. Try another position that you will feel works out for you. You can try by being on top and riding your partner while they are below. Avoid the one that will make your partner thrust more on you.
  • If the lube you use is more, try to minimize the amount, but if you are using less, try increasing some. It depends on how you are using the lube. Thus, make sure to use one, whatever the case. 
  • Using a pillow, you can try raising your hips or even your partner's hips and changing the angle or the way the air will enter during thrusting. 

Lever (2020) stated that one should also try to pay attention and focus on the sex positions. If you feel like a certain position makes you queef more, try and change the position. However, switching positions frequently during sex can make you queef more. You should try and focus on one that you feel works for you. When switching, you allow more air to get into the vagina. 

You may sometimes hear of women who also have queefs but not during sex as they get them during their menstrual cycle (Derman et al. 2018). As the period blood gets out, it sometimes comes out with a queef. You may think it is a medical issue because you associate queefing with sex. If it happens during this time, know that it is a normal thing and should not be of worry to you. At times, the kegel exercise may be the cause as well. In the real sense, you can not always be able to stop the queefing every time. Please try just laughing it off when it happens than making it feel like an embarrassment. It is a normal thing anyway. No one will shame you, especially if they know they get to go through it. Only a shameless person will see a big issue with the whole thing.

Conclusion 

If you have someone who understands and supports you, they will not care anytime you get the queef. You can even laugh it off together. However, if you feel like it is embarrassing you, you can always put on some music, and you will not hear it when it happens. You are the only person who will feel it. Also, try to hide your reaction when it happens. When you get to show how it affects you, you will make them give you a reaction to it. You might feel awkward at times, but in general, sex is awkward. Just try and get over it. It is a normal thing that needs to be embraced. Be sure to communicate with your partner and let them know if you get the queefs. This way, it will not come as a shock to them.             

References 

Derman, W., Schwellnus, M. P., Jordaan, E., Runciman, P., Blauwet, C., Webborn, N., ... & Stomphorst, J. (2018). Sport, sex and age increase risk of illness at the Rio 2016 summer Paralympic games: a prospective cohort study of 51 198 athlete days. British journal of sports medicine52(1), 17-23.

Egger, M. J., Sanchez-Birkhead, A. C., Clark, L., Curiel, R., Garcia, G., Fernandez, C., & Nygaard, I. E. (2021). Pelvic floor sensations after the first vaginal delivery: a qualitative study. Female pelvic medicine & reconstructive surgery27(1), e234.

Gaddis, B. (2017). Feng Shui Mommy: Creating Balance and Harmony for Blissful Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Motherhood. New World Library.

Hensel, D. J., von Hippel, C. D., Lapage, C. C., & Perkins, R. H. (2021). Women’s techniques for making vaginal penetration more pleasurable: Results from a nationally representative study of adult women in the United States. PloS one16(4), e0249242.Lever, J. (2020). Sex differences in the complexity of children's play and games. In Childhood socialization (pp. 325-343). Routledge.

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