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Six Myths About BDSM Debunked By Science

Six Myths About BDSM Debunked By Science

Six Myths About BDSM Debunked By Science

There are several myths about BDSM. The kinky sex mainstream, the 50 Shades of Grey, displayed much but failed to dismantle the numerous myths in BDSM. Look at the myths as discussed below.

Curiosity about BDSM was seen in the book 50 Shades of Grey mainstream. However, it failed to dispel some stereotypes and myths relating to BDSM. Good thing science debunks around six myths that shed some light. It wasn't easy to join a debate involving the stereotypes until recently when science helped back up more associated information. Numerous studies are taking the lead in strongly debunking these myths and the individuals involved. Let’s read on to find out details from this discussion.

BDSM myths debunked by science

BDSM lovers have more mental disorders

Three recent studies are against this myth. While the myth claims otherwise, some kinky people have fewer mental cases with more gratifying lies. Unlike the vanilla group, an Australian study showed that male BDS professionals reported lower psychological distress levels, less anxiety, and depression. There was no difference among the women. In another study, Quebecois suggested that individuals in masochism, fetishism, and exhibitionism believed they lived a more interesting life than ones without the same interests. Other paraphilic interests were neither negatively nor positively related to sex or love life and satisfaction. The third study involving 1000 Dutch BDSM lovers discovered that they were less sensitive to denial, neurotic, had higher subjecting wellness levels, and were strongly connected to their partners. This wasn't the case with the overall population that acted as a control in the study. Three groups, the dominatrix, submissives, and switches, were studied separately, and it was realized that many of such feelings were in doms. The others suffered less.

Few people are into kink.

In a nationally sampled Australians in 2001, only two percent of sexually active people reported having tried BDSM in the previous year. It may be challenging to conclude, but several individuals are involved in unusual sexual practices that would qualify as BDSM without realizing it. This may make them fail to report in a survey. In 2014, a study by Quebecois sampled 1,000 adults in a survey and discovered that at least a half showed interest in one activity considered kinky. These practices were, such as fetishism, voyeurism, masochism, exhibitionism, frotteurism, sadism, and travsvestism. About 5-50% of men and 3-21% of women practiced any of the mentioned practices at least once, if not frequently. That could mean that BDSM behaviors or urges may sound abnormal but aren't far from common.

It’s one thing; kinky or vanilla.

An existing myth suggests that kinky people can't get off on typical 'vanilla' sex. It further says that a kink they're into is essential for arousal, orgasm, or surely getting sexual satisfaction. Despite it truly applying to some kinky individuals, recent research indicates the number may be smaller. The findings demonstrated similar outcomes when listening to erotic stories when connected to various stimulation devices by different people. For instance, masochistic males and females gave the same self-reports matching the devices’ measurements on penile erection and vaginal blood flow when they separately listened to both vanilla and masochistic erotic stories. In short, both instances gave the same arousal. You could expect the nonmasochistic males and females to be turned on more by vanilla erotic stories, but that’s not the case.

Kinky people are harassed as children or adults.

This myth is an assumption for why some people are acting kinky. Is abuse the reason one would choose to get into kink? Well, two studies prove this assumption wrong. We looked at the two studies, the Quebecois and Australian, which discovered men and women who in the past year engaged or showed interest in fetish activities didn't report any torture or sexual abuse. Both children and adults gave positive reports like those lacking kinky fantasies or interests. Perhaps the only exception was frotteurism, rubbing yourself against others without consent. But, it was associated with child and adult contact under 12 years.

Men are doms, and women are submissive.

Generally, more women play as subs, whereas more men are doms. There's evidence that some men percentage take part in sexual submission and women in domination or sadism. To illustrate, in 2011, among more than 1,500 Quebec individuals, 60% of them dominated in a sexual encounter with another person, whereas 65% of women were 47%. The submissive side had about 65% women and 53% men. 30-50%, several men and women reported being tied up, coerced to have sex, whipped, or spanked in submissive fantasies. The numbers correlated, meaning those that fantasized about spanking or forcing sex experienced the same from their partners in the game. As reported, individuals who acted submissive had more sexual fancies than those who dominated.

Men in BDSM are abusive, aggressive, and sexists.

Are men in BDSM abusive? BDSM practitioners, more so men, have been branded abusive, but the opposite may be true. For instance, in a 2016 study, a BDSM community reported lower rape myth acceptance and benevolent sexism levels- a belief that women were vulnerable creatures that need protection from men. Another study in the same year stated that BDSM practitioners reported less future intentions of engaging in coercive sex or past involvement, which was the same for people without any interest in kinky plays. On the other hand, individuals reporting nonconsensual past engagement or intentions stated fewer issues associated with BDSM than kink practitioners.

The bottom line

Several myths have been associated with BDSM practices in the past. However, science has recently debunked the most common ones, thus helping delete misinformation.  It's now possible and more confidential to argue against these myths whenever debates pop up. The above discussion contains the most common six myths surrounding BDSM and its practitioners. Don't fall prey to any stereotypes that spread wrong information. If there are any other BDSM myths that you'd like science to expose, please share them with us.

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