icon
Free UK Shipping - Plain Packaging - Same Day Dispatch
Free UK Shipping - Plain Packaging - Same Day Dispatch
Skip to content
Uh Oh, Can’t Reach that Big O! - How to Have an Orgasm

Uh Oh, Can't Reach that Big O! - How to Have an Orgasm

Uh Oh, Can't Reach that Big O! - How to Have an Orgasm

By Tatyana Dyachenko

Many medications effect libido however the lesser talked about problem is the inability to achieve orgasm.

Unless you've experienced it you won't understand the frustration as you masturbate or have sex with a partner teetering on the edge of orgasm yet never quite hitting that high. This can be thoroughly frustrating and have a knock on effect where you avoid sex knowing that the effort comes with no reward.

There are many medications that work on the nervous system making the genitals less sensitive to simulation and thus inhibiting the orgasm ability. Of course if you need medication for a condition it's important to chat with your doctor before stopping altogether.

The medications include:

Anti-depressants

Anti-depressants, in particular the group known as SSRIs such as Prozac (fluoxetine) and Zoloft (Sertraline), can hinder the ability to orgasm. This seems ironic as when people take the medication their sense of wellbeing increases and so their sex drive heightens to reflect their inner confidence. Unfortunately although the USA have found an alternative in Wellbutrin - the drug we know as Zyban, currently used in the UK to help stop smoking - this has yet to be approved as an anti-depressant in the UK. This seems a shame as it is known to actually increase libido and the effects of orgasm.

You can take matters into your own hands, as although the normal routes may not bring you to the big O others might. Investing in a good powerful vibrator will help with clitoral stimulation and making sure you use branded batteries will help. Oral sex is unlikely to work and this can impact on your relationship as men love having the tools to make a woman climax, so if you find its seriously affecting your sex life, talk to your doctor about another medication or lowering the dose.

Pain Relief

At some point in our lives the majority of us need pain relief, whether for illness, headaches, post operation or a myriad of other reasons pain killers are a normal part of life.

Paracetamol and ibuprofen will not have an effect on your ability to orgasm however when stronger painkillers are used such as codeine and tramadol you will notice a difference.

Luckily almost as soon as the painkiller is out of the system your sexual function will return to normal, but what if you need these for longer? There are ways around it, such as waiting until just before you're due to have another dose before having sex, as sex releases endorphins and oxytocin you may find that this alone helps with the pain!

You can also buy lubricants that add a tingling sensation heightening the sensitivity of the genital area or creams and gels to apply before having sex.

Previous article PUSSY EATING 101: HOW TO GIVE GOOD ORAL SEX TO SOMEONE WITH A VULVA